Religion: Earliest Attempt At World Order

This likely will be my last time discussing religion. Unlike the last two times where I directly spoke out against certain religions and how they manage to work in contemporary times, today’s installment will be more on understanding why they work – a question that will require a philosophical analysis of this concept. Our discussion will be focused on exploring why religion might have been necessary and maybe still is. Later, we will get to understanding some shared ideologies among religions.

Where do we start? A new World Order? Sure, let’s start here – despite your forced consent that would’ve otherwise made no difference if you’d answered. The fundamentalists of religion saw the state of political chaos – the anarchy – invading our civilization as the people grew. With more people came more demands to meet their individual and collective needs. People would then give in to their animalistic instincts – their innate desires and ambition – and that would soon overcome any order of the people. Imagine a world without law and order, a world where ethics and moral were foreign ideas – this is exactly the kind of place religious fundamentalists realized and saw. In fear, they envisioned a word of order. A world where man’s innate desires were suppressed for the greater benefit of his fellows – and indirectly himself. The fundamentalist knew order cannot result from the reign of another man – because man’s ambition of a control of his territory would destroy his obedience – and conflict would soon prevail. The solution was to device something of an outside entity – a supreme and perfect being in all regards of man. An entity that lives and grows in apparent truth with the belief of man and other men.

Resources come at a premium – and anyone from a third-world can perfectly relate to this. Nothing is free. In a world survived by man’s innate desires, it would have been hard to ensure fair distribution of vital resources such as food. Also, as anyone who watches the National Geographic can describe – these desires are often lawless in modern hindsight. Animals aggressively secure their territory, their food and their potential mate at any costs. They fight among themselves and among others and form clans – where they venture together into unknown territories to conquer or mark as their own. The fundamentalist knew man was no different from his ancestor and such instincts would soon creep in as they outgrew in numbers eventually leading them to their own destruction. A need for a system of order was in dire necessity. A system to channel man’s own emotions – that he has been naturally predisposed with – against his unknowing will for the benefit of other men and himself. A concept of religion was therefore required.

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Third Tangent

We made it! This tangent will explore entropy from a very philosophical standpoint (you’ll later understand why), therefore I won’t be spitting out equations unless I really have to, but let’s just hope it doesn’t come to that. So what is entropy? In all essential terms, entropy is really just the unique state of a system at some arbitrary time. This unique state can only move in one direction – from ordered to disordered as work is done by this system on its immediate surroundings. Entropy can move backwards – from disordered to ordered if work is done on the system by its surroundings. But what makes entropy truly fascinating and mysterious is it’s unpredictability – the quantum chaos observed in every system in the physical universe. This chaos is one that cannot be fully quantified because it would then violate the Second Law (of Thermodynamics) as we know it. Why does it violate said law? Because we can then turn back time, technically. By knowing the kinetic state and positions of particles in a system, we can easily treat the quantum particles as classical ones and apply our knowledge of classical mechanics to extrapolate the state of some particle in the system to some arbitrary time, which will allow us to manipulate the system’s disorderliness without doing any actual work on it – which is counter-intuitive and in violation of the Second Law.

Any system being governed by another entity cannot fully understand the entity that’s controlling it

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