Our Education System Got An F

Education is believed to be the liberation of the mind, but is it anymore? Or was it ever? We are constantly fed with these age-old preconceived notions about education from society. And sometimes directly from the people who are meant to be educating us, almost creating a moral paradox! They tell us that school will enrich our creativity. They tell us how the intrinsic, natural creativity of the human mind is a speckles’ worth in contrast to the mind that has endured years of methodological indoctrination and testing. But are these notions valid? Or are we (they) confusing one thing for another? What are the drivers of education? How is it intertwined with the prevailing cultural and economical scene? These are some of the pressing questions that surfaces when one fundamentally re-examines the very concept of education that much of civilization has held on to dearly for decades, if not centuries. After years of school and college, it’s about time for us to step away from the tradition of receiving grades to being the ones to grade our education system.

Like every other endeavor of human civilization, education is one that has had its movements and reforms. From the early attempts at systematic indoctrination in religious and philosophical schools to the modern system consisting of graduated learning levels from elementary to graduate school, there are unmistakable commonalities to the keen eyes. From the times of the ancient Greek civilization, the Platonic academy and the two men, Socrates and Aristotle who surrounded his legacy to the Huehuetlatolli of the Aztecs to the madrasas of the Islamic world to the Vedic teachings of Indus Valley civilization – the earliest attempts of systematic indoctrination were based on the moral code essential to the functioning of early society. Their teachings were subjective to each civilization and time period, and very further subjective to the teacher or master leading the congregation. Education was simply restricted geographically and lost its relevance with the natural progression of civilization and the spread of ideas. Perhaps one of the most notable cultural exchange of the early days happened with the Silk Route, in a time when education was still in its infancy.

philosophy came to be the grand unifying force for many culturally-divested schools of education

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The Information Loop: Intellectual Stimulation or Retardation?

Today I am going to write about something a little controversial and what I’d like to call fancily the Information Loop. This loop represents every source we get our information from: news, answers to our crockery questions, and how to tie a tie, and by some magic the loop seems to have answers to all of them. I’m taking this up on myself to debate the intellectual effects from our reliance on this repository of knowledge.

Before I dive further, why call it a ‘loop’? And let me assure you I’d done a bit of thinking before calling dibs on ‘loop’. We are often inclined to believe what sources (of information) we chose to get our information from is solely per our discretion but is it really? The prerequisite of knowing where to get your information from is also information. You certainly wouldn’t be reading this if you hadn’t been informed of WordPress. If you’re still not seeing it, the information pertaining to the whereabouts of other sources of information is one that needs to be acquired from a source. There certainly is a hierarchy but it is also a source (of information) and follows suit until you establish yourself in a loop – where you get information from the same sources and turn to the same other sources for more information. Continue reading